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Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite: My Story

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Author: Roger Daltrey

Published: October 23rd 2018 by Henry Holt & Company

Format: Hardcover , 272 pages

Isbn: 9781250296030

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The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21 The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21st birthday,” says Roger Daltrey, the powerhouse vocalist of The Who. The result of this introspection is a remarkable memoir, instantly captivating, funny and frank, chock-full of well-earned wisdom and one-of-kind anecdotes from a raucous life that spans a tumultuous time of change in Britain and America. Born during the air bombing of London in 1944, Daltrey fought his way (literally) through school and poverty and began to assemble the band that would become The Who while working at a sheet metal factory in 1961. In Daltrey’s voice, the familiar stories—how they got into smashing up their kit, the infighting, Keith Moon’s antics—take on a new, intimate life. Also here is the creative journey through the unforgettable hits including My Generation, Substitute, Pinball Wizard, and the great albums, Who’s Next, Tommy, and Quadrophenia. Amidst all the music and mayhem, the drugs, the premature deaths, the ruined hotel rooms, Roger is our perfect narrator, remaining sober (relatively) and observant and determined to make The Who bigger and bigger. Not only his personal story, this is the definitive biography of The Who.

30 review for Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite: My Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite by Roger Daltrey is a 2018 Henry Holt and Co. Publication. “We’ll be fighting in the streets, with our children at our feet. And the morals that they worship will be gone. And the men who spurred us on, Sit in judgment of all wrong. They decide, and the shotgun sings the song.” Roger Daltrey. He’s kind of an enigma, I think, or least to me he is. It seems every member of “The Who’ has commanded newspaper headlines over the years, everyone except Roger, that is. No ins Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite by Roger Daltrey is a 2018 Henry Holt and Co. Publication. “We’ll be fighting in the streets, with our children at our feet. And the morals that they worship will be gone. And the men who spurred us on, Sit in judgment of all wrong. They decide, and the shotgun sings the song.” Roger Daltrey. He’s kind of an enigma, I think, or least to me he is. It seems every member of “The Who’ has commanded newspaper headlines over the years, everyone except Roger, that is. No insane antics or stage theatrics or ghastly criminal charges like those of Keith or Pete. Roger, by comparison, seems to be rather square. I honestly didn’t know a thing about him, other than what everyone else knows, which is centered around his career. I couldn’t have told you one single thing about his personal life. I didn’t even know the basics about him, like if he was married or had children, although I’d heard a few tales of his childhood where he had garnered a tough guy reputation. But the details of his upbringing were sketchy. So, while I’ve become rather picky about memoirs, especially those written by rock stars, my curiosity about Roger Daltrey won the day. I love ‘The Who’. Having formed in 1964, this is a group I’ve listened to my entire life. This is one of those enduring bands that have weathered many storms and survived over fifty years as a group. Incredible, when you think about it. Not only has Roger witnessed some monumental historical events, he’s also been a participant in them. Having spent so many years behind that insular rock star barrier, Roger has become accustomed to a way of life most of us couldn’t relate to. That’s part of the reason these books are so alluring, I suppose. We hear stories about conflict within the band, we know Roger and Pete had their moments, we know about Keith Moon’s antics, and of John’s untimely death. But we still want a bird’s eye view, want to hear Roger’s side of the story, want to relive his glory days with him, take a trip down memory lane, and want to know more about the person behind the rock star persona. Roger’s approach to his memoir is laid back and relaxed. He can be funny, charming, and witty, but does show a vulnerable side of himself on a very rare occasion. Despite spending over fifty years in a rock group, he still carries a blue collar, working class, chip on his shoulder. He’s capable of sensitivity and spoke with some candor regarding childhood and school days, traumas, which left emotional scars he battled much of his adult life, hiding his lack of confidence behind a tough exterior. “That was the point at which the headmaster, Mr. Kibblewhite, decided I was expelled. “We can’t control you, Daltrey”, he said. “You’re Out.” And, as I left his office for the last time, a parting gesture: “You’ll never make anything of your life, Daltrey.” “Thanks a lot, Mr. Kibblewhite, I thought.” Yet, despite those rare glimpses inside of Roger’s more personal inner workings, the bulk of the book is centered on Roger’s professional life-the road to success, and all the various ups and downs of forming a band, maintaining the unit, and of course coping with the excesses of life on the road and the horrible tragedies the band endured. However, I never really felt the chemistry between Roger and his band-mates, other than a poignant story he shared about Keith shortly before his death. Roger’s personal relationships with friends, colleagues, and women also lacked warmth or depth. There was one point in the book where, despite knowing this is normal operating procedure for rock stars, I still balked, and yes, passed judgments, on Roger’s view of fidelity or his case- infidelity. What he described was a one-sided open marriage. He was not to be expected to be ‘a good boy’ while on the road, because it gets lonely out there. I wondered if his wife got lonely during his long absences, and if she were expected to be ‘a good girl’ while he was away or if she was free to engage in emotion-less hookups too. I mean, according to Roger, a shag is just a shag. A bit of a double standard there, I think. But this was not the only area in which Roger showed his age. It was a bit ironic that one of the ‘My Generation’ performers sounded very old-fashioned at times. Occasionally Roger would bait the reader with information, only to never mention the subject again or to toss it out as an aside, when it clearly deserved more attention and time than he gave it. The book comes in at less than three hundred pages, which is awfully thin, when there is obviously so much ground to cover, both personally and professionally. Still, as far as rock memoirs go, this one is not too shabby. Roger is articulate and plain spoken, and as a performer, he knew how to keep the reader’s attention. The material is well-organized, and he does hit upon the major events that shaped his life and career, which for the casual fan will certainly suffice. Diehard fans will be pleased with anything Roger puts out there, but others, like myself, may wish there had been a little more bulk and depth than was provided. One thing I was reminded of, however, is how compared to many other people in his line of work, Roger is very dependable and is a solid performer. He may not have the artistic flair of Pete Townshend, but he puts everything into his shows, has an admirable work ethic, is a highly energetic singer, and a really nice set of pipes. He grew to be a versatile, multi-talented artist in his own right, not only as the ‘The Who’frontman, but with other groups, and in his acting roles. He’s a superstar rock star all the way from the top of those luscious curly locks to the tips of his toes. Roger has recently experienced some health problems, and is feeling the effects of his age, but he’s still sharp as ever, and still performs with ‘The Who’ on occasion His most recent show took place just this past summer. One can’t help but feel awed by the longevity of the group, and Roger’s stamina. His body of work is impressive, as is the mark he’s made on the world of music and the arts. 3.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Whilst not traditionally a massive fan of the Who, I do find rock biographies consistently interesting. It’s fascinating to me how a few kids can buy their first guitar or sing in their first band and then, with a little talent, a little time and a lot of luck, become some of the biggest, most influential rock musicians in the world (rather than grumpy guitar teachers like myself!) Roger Daltrey writes a good honest account of his life and the history of The Who. As someone who takes his fitness Whilst not traditionally a massive fan of the Who, I do find rock biographies consistently interesting. It’s fascinating to me how a few kids can buy their first guitar or sing in their first band and then, with a little talent, a little time and a lot of luck, become some of the biggest, most influential rock musicians in the world (rather than grumpy guitar teachers like myself!) Roger Daltrey writes a good honest account of his life and the history of The Who. As someone who takes his fitness seriously and never slid down the rabbit hole of drugs and alcohol, he is able to cast a clear eye on the life of the band. In his book he examines the often disfunctional relationship between himself and Pete Townshend, the self destructive ways of Keith Moon, the band’s haphazard creative process, the crazy excesses and the mad, incident packed world tours. The Who never really functioned well as a group of friends and the bust ups were endless. Strangely, this may have helped the longevity of the band ie when not on tour they led their own lives away from each other. Daltrey lives a comfortable life in a big house in the country with his wife and family and as well as being the iconic frontman of The Who, has had various solo projects, from solo albums, acting jobs to the extensive, long term manual labour involved in restoring his historic house. I liked Roger Daltrey which is always good when reading an autobiography, his honesty, outspokenness even his occasional cockiness was refreshing. On the downside, I found the book too short and it felt a little rushed - interesting incidents were mentioned but not elaborated on - I also wasn’t so keen on the structure which was incident and subject based rather than chronological and (as a bit of a music geek) I would have liked more detail on the song writing process, but I guess I’ll have to read Pete Townshend’s autobiography for more on that. Overall though, a good solid autobiography written without a ghost writer. It didn’t tick all the boxes for me but it was written from the heart and Daltrey’s summing up of his life so far, is surprisingly moving. 3.5 Stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Majenta

    Thanks a lot, Mr. Daltrey, for sharing Who you are!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Detroit

    It wasn’t easy for Roger Daltrey to get noticed in The Who, let alone heard, on stage with three Geniuses (punctuation is mine), all of whom wanted to play lead, steering clear of the carnage while keeping the others in line, usually with his fists, each performance hitting home like a smart bomb payload. Despite my endless proselytizing about the likes of Mott the Hoople, The New York Dolls, Ramones, The Clash, and The Stooges, The Who, in their prime, were the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band to ev It wasn’t easy for Roger Daltrey to get noticed in The Who, let alone heard, on stage with three Geniuses (punctuation is mine), all of whom wanted to play lead, steering clear of the carnage while keeping the others in line, usually with his fists, each performance hitting home like a smart bomb payload. Despite my endless proselytizing about the likes of Mott the Hoople, The New York Dolls, Ramones, The Clash, and The Stooges, The Who, in their prime, were the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band to ever draw air. If you didn’t see them while Keith Moon was still alive, you missed them forever. He was not only the best drummer in rock and roll, he was the ONLY one, sounding like he came from out of nowhere to take over the world. Of course I’m carried away right now. That’s the way I roll. With Moon behind the drum kit doing whatever the hell he was doing back there – 40 years after he left this mortal coil, it’s still a mystery - John Entwistle standing stock still and bringing the thunder with fingers seemingly made of asbestos, and Pete Townshend abusing Rickenbackers, Gibsons, and his own hands, nervous and constantly hacked off about something, Daltrey handled the dirty business of bringing Townshend’s ofttimes difficult and complicated lyrics to the great unwashed masses, swinging his microphone like David with the sling against Goliath, unknowingly creating the sartorial template for most singers that came after him, curls, fringes, and all. For those who have been following the plot, Daltrey once again rolls out the stories of a band hamstrung by its own myth, but somehow they never get old, from the good to the bad to the absurd to the tragic (the early demises of Entwistle and Moon and the Cincinnati “stampede” show). There’s The Who’s live U.S. debut at the Monterey Pop Festival, which ended with the ritual destruction of equipment and what amounted to assault and battery on the flower children - leaving them wondering what happened to peace and love - and contrary to popular belief, making Jimi Hendrix’s ensuing flaming guitar sacrifice look like a cub scout marshmallow roast. There’s the Cow Palace show where Keith Moon couldn’t soldier on after a self-administered dose of monkey tranquilizer, causing Townshend to ask the throng, “Can anybody play the drums?” Enter 19-year-old Scot Halpin. You couldn’t make stuff like this up if you tried. The rubble left in the wake of their appearance on “The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” insured it would be their only appearance on a U.S. variety show, the band going off script with a post lip-synched “My Generation” detonation of a triple-packed charge concealed inside Moon’s bass drum which left Townshend with hair ablaze and completely deaf for 20 minutes. I could go on all night but Daltrey tells it better. All of this is just a fancy way of saying I loved this book. Townshend once predicted The Who would go out with a “huge explosion” and while the fuse has been lit for some years now, nothing yet. Daltrey and Townshend carry on for an army of true believers laboring under the impression that as long as the beautiful rock god and the ugly genius are up there, it still IS The Who. But without any internal crises, do they really have any reason for being?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Solid, well written autobiography by Roger Daltrey, lead singer of The Who. 8 of 10 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Very readable autobiography by The Who’s frontman. It feels very honestly written and there are some laugh aloud parts to it. I really like the fact that it’s clear Roger wrote it himself, with no ghost writer. As I read, I could imagine him talking and that was great. He skips out a few parts I’d have liked to have learned more about.. Live Aid, for example. However, it’s very straightforward and to the point, which is how I imagine the man himself to be. He pulls no punches about his relations Very readable autobiography by The Who’s frontman. It feels very honestly written and there are some laugh aloud parts to it. I really like the fact that it’s clear Roger wrote it himself, with no ghost writer. As I read, I could imagine him talking and that was great. He skips out a few parts I’d have liked to have learned more about.. Live Aid, for example. However, it’s very straightforward and to the point, which is how I imagine the man himself to be. He pulls no punches about his relationships with other members of the band, and it’s interesting to hear how he and Pete Townshend have settled their differences, but there was always respect albeit grudgingly so at times. Well worth a read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan M

    In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life. To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life. To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty of humour – a story about a “cut and shut” Aston Martin had me laughing out loud. Some of Daltrey’s perspectives aren’t that surprising – like many others in their senior years (he’s now 75) he looks back longingly at the simpler times gone by, professing not to understand the modern world demands for instant gratification, although his nostalgia seems undiminished by the poverty of his upbringing. Content and comfortable with his lot now, it’s done little to take the edge off him. Witness his description of Kenney Jones drumming – and he regards Kenney as a mate! Daltrey is driven and uncompromising. Generally, not a recipe for longevity in a rock band. And yet he made it work. He was smart enough to see that Townshend was the creative genius that the band needed to take them to the very top, and as undesirable as some of their personal qualities were, Entwistle and Moon were the other elements needed to make it happen. He says more than once that he was all in – he had nothing else going. He doesn’t shy from describing the downsides of working with such dysfunctional band mates – Townsend’s lack of focus, cushioned by his publishing income, Moon’s desperate need for attention. Few surprises here although Daltrey’s reference to Entwistle’s “nasty” nature were new to me. Overall, it reads as if Daltrey put up with it all because he knew it was better than the alternative – something that it’s far from clear that the others understood. In many respects Daltrey sees himself as the outsider. Bright enough to pass the 11 plus, but alienated from his new “posh” schoolmates, he saw education as a punishment and only grasps later in life it was something he could have taken much more from. He also becomes exile in the band – fired and then grudgingly re-admitted – on probation - after laying Moon out to finish an argument about drugs. Two years of niggling windups follow, Daltrey determined not to give them the satisfaction of resolving it with his fists. All of that said looking back Daltrey sums it up “something that gets missed in all the war stories about The Who …. we respected each other”. A few things remain unremarked upon; his CBE award in 2005, The Who’s induction to the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, his album with Wilko Johnson. But beyond these details, it’s a comprehensive story, told with energy and humour. Still, a bit surprised at the book title though – “I Can Explain” surely?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    A solid, well written autobiography from Roger Daltrey, lead singer of The Who. 8 of 10 stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    I am not a big fan of The Who but like them well enough. I decided to read Roger Daltrey's biography more on a whim than anything else. It’s surprisingly good. Roger Daltrey comes over as a really forthright and decent bloke who just happened to end up in a rock band. The stories from his humble West London working class childhood are really interesting. That Roger is by far and away the most grounded and sane member of The Who comes as no surprise. His matter-of-fact tales of his bandmates' beh I am not a big fan of The Who but like them well enough. I decided to read Roger Daltrey's biography more on a whim than anything else. It’s surprisingly good. Roger Daltrey comes over as a really forthright and decent bloke who just happened to end up in a rock band. The stories from his humble West London working class childhood are really interesting. That Roger is by far and away the most grounded and sane member of The Who comes as no surprise. His matter-of-fact tales of his bandmates' behaviour are frequently jaw dropping. To say the other members have (or had) issues is an understatement. Overall this is an entertaining, insightful, hugely likeable and extremely readable rock biography. My only complaint, it's far too short. 5/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    Georgette

    Loved it. As much as I enjoyed Pete Townsend's memoir, Daltrey's is more down to earth and less ego than Pete's. A quick and fun read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fox

    Anyone who follows me likely knows the absurd amount of books about The Who that I read. When I saw Roger was coming out with an autobiography I immediately slammed the "put on hold at your local library" button. What else was I to do? At least I had 22 people behind me waiting for it. Nevermind there were over 10 people ahead of me. I'd get it in time. It's a shame this book didn't garner the press that Pete Townshend's book did. While both are rather good, I felt Roger Daltrey's was much mor Anyone who follows me likely knows the absurd amount of books about The Who that I read. When I saw Roger was coming out with an autobiography I immediately slammed the "put on hold at your local library" button. What else was I to do? At least I had 22 people behind me waiting for it. Nevermind there were over 10 people ahead of me. I'd get it in time. It's a shame this book didn't garner the press that Pete Townshend's book did. While both are rather good, I felt Roger Daltrey's was much more what people wanted when they wanted a Who biography. They wanted information about the band, interspersed with information about the person's life. Daltrey's book was just that, whereas Townshend's was the opposite. Both have their own merits, and I devoured both of them with a similar level of eagerness. Daltrey is just a much more accessible person than Pete. It has always been that way. Daltrey's book is a book of thankfulness. In it he talks often about his own work ethic, and there is a constant undercurrent of his knowledge of how lucky he has ultimately been. His luck comes largely from his willingness to work, to show up, to force other's into shape. Still, there is that element of luck there all the same. Miss one element of the core four members of the band and they never would have exploded onto the scene the way they did. There's a reason the hiatus post-Keith went on for as long as it did, after all. Roger knows that. And he is open from start to finish about his thoughts on it all, as he always has been. This book was a true pleasure, and optimistic from start to finish. There's always a view towards the future, and a wry smile that when he goes, he wishes to go out right. He'll be working on until his dying day, and as long as Pete is there the music will never quite end. Nevertheless, he knows the world now isn't quite what it used to be... and on that he is open as well. There was a certain cultural climate that allowed the rock and roll revolution to happen, and he explain it in a far more accessible way than most books about the band do. You get it. In short, I think this book is a great book for fans of the band and the lay-reader alike. Although obviously fans of the band will likely get a bit more out of it than others.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    Much, much better than Who I Am by Pete Townsend. More direct, more candid, more personal -- just more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Norma

    ( Format : Audiobook ) "Behind blue eyes." Long time fans of the group, The Who, are used to periodic public pontificating by Pete (Townsend) but from Daltrey, not so much. In fact, hardly at all. So this is a very welcome book from the band's singer and voice of Tommy who was there from the very inception of the group fifty years ago. And because he's written it himself, his voice shines out from every page, telling his story, correcting some myths and describing his journey with the three othe ( Format : Audiobook ) "Behind blue eyes." Long time fans of the group, The Who, are used to periodic public pontificating by Pete (Townsend) but from Daltrey, not so much. In fact, hardly at all. So this is a very welcome book from the band's singer and voice of Tommy who was there from the very inception of the group fifty years ago. And because he's written it himself, his voice shines out from every page, telling his story, correcting some myths and describing his journey with the three other legends, Pete, of course, the genius behind the music, their crazy talented drummer, Keith Moon, and the bass guitarist who changed the way that instrument was played, John Entwistle. All were huge talents, all had enormous egos and it was down to Roger to hold it all together - which miraculously he did, even after the deaths of two of their number. This is a modest book from a man who not only fronted - and still continues with Pete - one of the greatest rock bands ever, but who also works hard to raise money for the Prince's Teenage Cancer Trust. There is very little name dropping even though he has played and been acquainted with many of the top stars in the industry, but when someone is mentioned, it is usually to thank them. Instead, he concentrates on personalities, his own and the others in The Who, and his general life history, no punches dodged, from growing up in the post war deprivation to his now much more comfortable life with his family. And what comes through it all most strongly, as in Michael Caine's autobiography, B!owing the Bloody Doors Off, is the dedication to hard work with singleminded pursuit of the goal combined with the love of and reliance on family. This is a quick and easy book to read. I had first purchased the hardback then saw it's availability on Audib!e. Roger Daltry narrates, his distinctive voice slightly gruff following a throat injury and life threatening illness not too long ago. It has always amazed me that someone who can belt out Pete's lyrics with such power - and, oh, that scream in Won't Get Fooled Again! - could still talk at all. But he can and his warmth in the telling of his story, with just a tinge of bitterness at times, shines through. Whilst almost identical to the text version, the audio does have occasional small differences, a word changed, a sentence ommitted, nothing much, but what isn't in the text book and is so precious is Roger's occasional burst of delighted laughter at a memory recovered. Pure magic. A must for all Who fans, this is also a book to be enjoyed by everyone: with a vibrant picture of life in the post war years, the coming of music and colour in the sixties and a story of four completely different and distinctive personalities who came, and somehow stayed, together to help change the music scene. Great stuff.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Bach

    Totally enjoyed this book and as a fan I am proud to say Roger Daltrey personally signed this to me on the rock legends cruise 2020. Before he smashed his birthday cake in my face. I can definitely say I am a true fan!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I remember when I was a wee lad I was watching this movie called Tommy where the content of the movie went way over my head but the music impressed the heck out of me. This was before I really was conscious of the Beatles or the Rolling Stones and made me more of a fan of the Who than the other two great British bands. I am generally not that much into the autobiographies of rock bands or Rock stars as they generally use the medium to clear their own front yard and I understood that the other Pet I remember when I was a wee lad I was watching this movie called Tommy where the content of the movie went way over my head but the music impressed the heck out of me. This was before I really was conscious of the Beatles or the Rolling Stones and made me more of a fan of the Who than the other two great British bands. I am generally not that much into the autobiographies of rock bands or Rock stars as they generally use the medium to clear their own front yard and I understood that the other Pete Townsend from the band had laid a lot of blame at Roger Daltry's feet, taking into account that Townsend has been a junkie for most of his career. But I made an exception for Roger Daltry whose vocals and role in the Who as a lead-singer always had his Charm. I did of course know something about his role in the fantasy tv-series Highlander which gets no mention at all in this book. Daltry was playing a loving rogue which perhaps was a role closer to his personality than he would like to admit. Anyhow learning about Roger and his youth was interesting and also the early years of Daltry and the band that became known as The Who. While Daltry paint a charming picture he does occasionally slips in some issues you'd like to know more about. Like his infidelities as a Rock Star and how that had his effect on his home situation and then he mentions his children out of wedlock which would be influential on anybodies life. He paints a loving picture about his ever-loving wife Heather who stayed at home and kept his home situation calm and accepted everything that happened when Mr. Daltry was away on the job. The story of The Who through the eyes of Daltry is nonetheless an interesting story, about the self-destructing attitude of Keith Moon, the stubbornness and sheer genius of Pete Townsend and the original musical genius of John Entwistle. Daltry paints himself as the lead singer that fit the profile for the band with three musical geniuses and one lead-singer. A nice view upon the antics by a one of the great Bands from the sixties which find me more enchanted than the two other bands that were big at that time. For me an enjoyable tale that tells de lighter side and skips easily about the morality of the darker side of Rock 'n Roll. Still fun to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ron S

    The front man for The Who tells his side of the story, in a calm and simple way as though you're hearing your grand da reminisce with a cuppa tea by the fire. Moonie and The Ox certainly led wilder lives, but then they're no longer with us, are they?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gary Anderson

    Almost a five. I can't explain.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christi

    “I spent a lot of time with the disabled extras we had in the film, and they taught me a lot. I already knew from Mike Shaw how difficult life in a wheelchair could be. You just need to push someone around for a day and you realize how hard it is, and how little things make a huge difference. Things like kneeling down to talk to wheelchair users at their eye level. No one’s educated about it, are they? And because they aren’t, it creates a barrier. How hard would it be to replace one, just one, “I spent a lot of time with the disabled extras we had in the film, and they taught me a lot. I already knew from Mike Shaw how difficult life in a wheelchair could be. You just need to push someone around for a day and you realize how hard it is, and how little things make a huge difference. Things like kneeling down to talk to wheelchair users at their eye level. No one’s educated about it, are they? And because they aren’t, it creates a barrier. How hard would it be to replace one, just one, trigonometry class for a lesson run by a disabled person, explaining what would make their lives easier. Because everyone would do it. Even the toughest kids would do it. And it would make a huge difference to society.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scott Hitchcock

    I liked the Who growing up. I've long been sick of them and just about all of the classic rock genre having just heard it ad nauseum over the years. I have read about most of the other big names of that era from Zeppelin to Hendrix to Morrison.....down the line so figured it was time. This was an audiobook read by the author. I highly recommend doing it in this format. Daltrey is a great performer and really adds to the experience. He mentions Townshend has a book. I may need to read it for cont I liked the Who growing up. I've long been sick of them and just about all of the classic rock genre having just heard it ad nauseum over the years. I have read about most of the other big names of that era from Zeppelin to Hendrix to Morrison.....down the line so figured it was time. This was an audiobook read by the author. I highly recommend doing it in this format. Daltrey is a great performer and really adds to the experience. He mentions Townshend has a book. I may need to read it for contrast. Daltrey almost always has a reason why his perspective was and is still the correct one, don't we all? But I have to believe after reading some of this that his band mates often felt very different on these topics. Definitely worth the read/listen especially if you're a fan.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jackie "the Librarian"

    I just listened to Roger Daltrey's memoir, Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite, narrated by Roger himself. Did you know Daltrey could sew, and was running a little uniform alteration service for his grammar school, turning baggy pant legs into skinny drainpipes? These skills came in handy later, for creating his rock god outfits. He also can make a decent sandwich, or sarny. Daltrey has a reputation as a brawler with a temper, but what comes through in this memoir is his love for bandmates, and deep a I just listened to Roger Daltrey's memoir, Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite, narrated by Roger himself. Did you know Daltrey could sew, and was running a little uniform alteration service for his grammar school, turning baggy pant legs into skinny drainpipes? These skills came in handy later, for creating his rock god outfits. He also can make a decent sandwich, or sarny. Daltrey has a reputation as a brawler with a temper, but what comes through in this memoir is his love for bandmates, and deep appreciation for his life. Roger is warm, funny, and empathetic, and has nothing but gratitude for his partnership with Pete Townshend in The Who. He's, in a way, Kirk to Townshend's Spock. A life of Maximum R&B, and a good read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve Delo

    An engaging, easy and fast read. Daltrey has lived an interesting life and his narrative is refreshingly humble, honest and plainly told. Quite blunt in places, he portrays his former Who colleagues - like Keith Moon - not as gods but real people with plenty of failings and demons. It is fascinating to read Daltrey's not entirely amused take on the copious hotel carnage and on stage antics. He also makes it clear that family life is more important than work - even for a rock legend! I really enjo An engaging, easy and fast read. Daltrey has lived an interesting life and his narrative is refreshingly humble, honest and plainly told. Quite blunt in places, he portrays his former Who colleagues - like Keith Moon - not as gods but real people with plenty of failings and demons. It is fascinating to read Daltrey's not entirely amused take on the copious hotel carnage and on stage antics. He also makes it clear that family life is more important than work - even for a rock legend! I really enjoyed this.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I love a rock biography and this is a particularly great one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve Peifer

    Consider if you will the plight of someone who you have worked with and grown to despise, and you discover you have no career without them. You are forced to be together and it must breed an intense hatred to need someone you can’t stand. Or, the story of The Who. It really was as crazy as they said it was in the sixties and virtually every stupid thing that could be done, they did it. As in many of these books, the struggle to make it is always the best part of the story. Once they make it and s Consider if you will the plight of someone who you have worked with and grown to despise, and you discover you have no career without them. You are forced to be together and it must breed an intense hatred to need someone you can’t stand. Or, the story of The Who. It really was as crazy as they said it was in the sixties and virtually every stupid thing that could be done, they did it. As in many of these books, the struggle to make it is always the best part of the story. Once they make it and screw it up again and again, it’s pretty cringe worthy. And the way that he deals with the deaths of Keith and John is about as cold as cold can be. He stayed married to the same woman and stayed in the same house for 50 years, which is almost freakish by rock standards. Good for him. And I truly still love some of their music. Can’t even imagine what they might have created if they weren’t such idiots, but I’m still glad for what we have.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark Mortensen

    Thoreau once stated: “I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.” Roger Daltrey did not fit into regimented school and when Mr. Kibblewhite expelled him at age 15 he adhered to his passion and charted his own course in life. In his autobiography the founding member of the classic rock group Who documents his life story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I don't remember which family member played The Who in the early 70's, but I loved them from the first time I heard them. I memorized the words to their songs and have listened to them through good and bad albums since the first time I heard them all those years ago (although I still return to the early records when I am listening to them at home or in the car). Roger Daltrey tells an easy to follow and interesting story of how he grew up, when he knew he wanted to play music, what ensued to cre I don't remember which family member played The Who in the early 70's, but I loved them from the first time I heard them. I memorized the words to their songs and have listened to them through good and bad albums since the first time I heard them all those years ago (although I still return to the early records when I am listening to them at home or in the car). Roger Daltrey tells an easy to follow and interesting story of how he grew up, when he knew he wanted to play music, what ensued to create The Who, and the often tumultuous pathways the band took over the years. First of all, the book is a genuinely interesting and good read that is well written. The stories in the book made me keep reading and often times I found myself laughing out loud at the humor in the writing. I was hooked early on in the narrative when I found myself picturing Roger and his co-workers singing while working to the rhythm tools made during the day. I already knew a lot about The Who having been a fan for so long, yet I still learned a lot about what drove them, why they have ended up still working together, and how the complexities of each of them being SO talented ended up working for them when it could have easily ended very quickly. The fact that they are (or were) so talented is why books like this are important to read. These were four very different people who brought not only musical talent, but other talents and genius to the table as well. It was often times not easy, yet they persisted. This is a great story of leadership, compromise, creativity, growth, vision, hard work, self awareness, and fabulous music.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barry Hammond

    For a band with such a tumultuous history and one that's been written about extensively and after Pete Townsend's many interviews and his autobiography, it's nice to finally have The Who's front man and singer, Roger Daltrey, give his version of events. Needless to say, his version is quite different than some of the stories that have circulated. He endeavors to cut through the fictions and give a straightforward account from his point of view. It's a down-to-earth, meat and potatoes account wit For a band with such a tumultuous history and one that's been written about extensively and after Pete Townsend's many interviews and his autobiography, it's nice to finally have The Who's front man and singer, Roger Daltrey, give his version of events. Needless to say, his version is quite different than some of the stories that have circulated. He endeavors to cut through the fictions and give a straightforward account from his point of view. It's a down-to-earth, meat and potatoes account with a good deal of clear-sighted common sense involved. He doesn't avoid the complicated issues but tackles them straight on. This understated approach has power and can occasionally shock (such as the page where he acknowledges his four out-of-wedlock children in three tough little paragraphs). The book is tightly edited and he doesn't indulge himself in flights of fancy - just the facts as the cop in "Dragnet" used to say. It's a fast but very interesting read with both humor and pathos and a good chunk of musical history. - BH.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    A great, straightforward, and plain-spoken story, the plain truth from the guy who lived it. Refreshingly direct and free of any "literary" pretension, this was a wonderful read and is mandatory for serious Who fans. Complements Pete's book in the same unpretentious way that Dave Davies' "Kink" complemented Ray's "X-Ray." If you're looking for profound ruminations on The Meaning Of It All, or for trainspotting detail about what was happening at 6:43PM GMT on the evening of December 13, 1965, the A great, straightforward, and plain-spoken story, the plain truth from the guy who lived it. Refreshingly direct and free of any "literary" pretension, this was a wonderful read and is mandatory for serious Who fans. Complements Pete's book in the same unpretentious way that Dave Davies' "Kink" complemented Ray's "X-Ray." If you're looking for profound ruminations on The Meaning Of It All, or for trainspotting detail about what was happening at 6:43PM GMT on the evening of December 13, 1965, then look elsewhere. On the other hand, if you want to learn more about what, say, John Entwistle was *really* like in 4 or 5 pages than 99% of the corpus of Who literature has managed to get across in 5 decades, this is the book for you. Really enjoyed this.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann Cooper

    No ghostwriter here! I loved this honest account of Daltrey’s life with and without The Who. I’m a long time fan and learning the background to his life with the band was illuminating. Just one thing, though, Roger. When you and your band performed Tommy at the RAH, Pete DID turn up for Acid Queen!

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Allgood

    Daltry’s memoir is not a highly polished and slick work but it seems honest. He does his best to tell his version on The Who’s history. A quick read and enjoyable. I can’t help comparing it to Townshend’s memoir. Pete came across as more cryptic and self serving while Roger comes across as a long chat in a pub; perhaps both reflect the respective authors personalities.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joe Faust

    Roger Daltrey's take on his life before, during, and between The Who. While the band history bits are his side of things, keep in mind that Rog was always the most grounded - and comparatively sober - of the group. He tells his story with great humor, and the audio version (read by the author) is like sitting across a table from him at a pub and listening to him spin stories.

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